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NBA

Best NBA players not in the Basketball Hall of Fame

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Chauncey Billups, Chris Webber, Ben Wallace (NBA Getty Images)

On Friday, a new class of legends will be inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

While there's no denying that this year's class features some all-time greats - including but not limited to Vlade Divac, Sidney Moncrief and Jack Sikma - there are a number of players who are noticeably absent. Among them: Chauncey Billups, Chris Webber, Shawn Marion and Ben Wallace.

There are also players who have been eligible for the Hall of Fame for years that have yet to be inducted, such as Tim Hardaway, Shawn Kemp and Marques Johnson.

Here's the Hall of Fame case for each of those players, plus several others widely considered to be Hall of Fame worthy.

Chauncey Billups, PG

Resume: 5-time All-Star, 2004 NBA champion, 2004 NBA Finals MVP, 1-time All-NBA Second Team, 2-time All-NBA Third Team, 2-time All-Defensive Second Team

It took Billups some time to find his footing in the NBA - especially when compared to some other players on this list - but he asserted himself as one of the best point guards in the league by his late 20s.

Though he didn't make his first All-Star team until his ninth season, Billups went on to make five of them and led the Detroit Pistons to a championship in 2004, marking the franchise's third title. He averaged 21.0 points, 5.2 assists and 3.2 rebounds per game against the Los Angeles Lakers in the Finals, earning him Finals MVP.

Billups has career averages of 15.2 points, 5.4 assists, 2.9 rebounds and 1.0 steals per game. His No. 1 jersey has been retired by the Pistons.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 84.4 percent.

Tim Hardaway, PG

Resume: 5-time All-Star, 1-time All-NBA First Team, 3-time All-NBA Second Team, 1-time All-NBA Third Team, All-Rookie First Team

Hardaway is the only member from the famed "Run TMC" Golden State Warriors to not be in the Hall of Fame. Chris Mullin was inducted in 2011 while Mitch Richmond made it in 2014.

In addition to making three All-Star teams with the Warriors, Hardaway made two with the Miami Heat. With him leading the way, the Heat won 61 games in the 1996-97 season. Only the 2012-13 Heat, who were comprised of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, have won more games in a single season in franchise history.

Similar to how Shawn Kemp is known for being one of the NBA's first power dunkers - more on him below - Hardaway is credited for popularizing the crossover.

Hardaway has career averages of 17.7 points, 8.2 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 1.6 steals per game. His No. 10 jersey has been retired by the Heat.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 79.2 percent.

Shawn Marion, SF/PF

Resume: 4-time All-Star, 2011 NBA champion, 2-time All-NBA Third Team, All-Rookie Second Team

Marion was an integral part of the Steve Nash-led Phoenix Suns teams that dominated the early 2000s. He was ahead of his time as a 6-foot-7 forward who could defend multiple positions, protect the rim, get out in transition and space the floor as a shooter.

While he never won a championship with the Suns, Marion started in every postseason game for the Dallas Mavericks during their championship run in 2011 and spent a significant portion of that series guarding LeBron James, who endured one of the worst playoff series of his entire career.

Marion has career averages of 15.2 points, 8.7 rebounds, 1.9 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.1 blocks per game.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 75.6 percent.

Ben Wallace, C

Resume: 4-time All-Star, 2004 NBA champion, 4-time Defensive Player of the Year, 5-time All-Defensive First Team, 3-time All-NBA Second Team, 2-time All-NBA Third Team

There are only 12 players in NBA history who have more All-Defensive First Team selections than Wallace. All eight that are eligible for the Hall of Fame have been selected while the others - Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett and Chris Paul - are locks. Furthermore, his four Defensive Player of the Year award ties him with Hall-of-Famer Dikembe Mutombo for the most all-time.

Wallace won a championship as a member of the Pistons in 2004 and was the defensive anchor on a team that made six straight trips to the Conference Finals. Shaquille O'Neal still put up big numbers in the 2004 NBA Finals, but his ability to guard the Los Angeles Lakers superstar 1-on-1 helped the Pistons contain everyone else. Wallace also outplayed O'Neal in the final game of the series, going for 18 points and 22 rebounds compared to 20 points and eight rebounds for O'Neal.

Wallace has career averages of 5.7 points, 9.6 rebounds, 2.0 blocks and 1.3 steals per game. His No. 3 jersey has been retired by the Pistons. Wallace's resume isn't much different than Dennis Rodman, another defensive dynamo and rebounding champion that was inducted in 2011.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 45.3 percent.

Shawn Kemp, PF

Resume: 6-time All-Star, 3-time All-NBA Second Team

Longevity hurts Kemp's Hall of Fame case - there was a steep decline when he entered his 30s - but he was a force to be reckoned with in the 1990s. The combination of him and Gary Payton fueled the Seattle SuperSonics to the NBA Finals in 1996, where they lost to Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls in six games. Kemp was tremendous in that postseason run with averages of 20.9 points, 10.4 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per game.

A perennial contender, the SuperSonics had the NBA's third-best record during Kemp's eight years with the franchise behind only the Bulls and Utah Jazz.

Kemp is remembered as one of the greatest dunkers of all-time. He brought a type of power and flair that is more common in today's NBA but was rarely seen during that time in league history.

Kemp has career averages of 14.6 points, 8.4 rebounds, 1.6 assists, 1.2 blocks and 1.1 steals per game.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 38.5 percent.

Marques Johnson, SF

Resume: 5-time All-Star, 1-time All-NBA First Team, 2-time All-NBA Second Team, All-Rookie First Team, 1-time NCAA champion, 1-time College Player of the Year

Johnson wasted little time making a name for himself in the pros. In his second season with the Milwaukee Bucks, he led the team with 25.6 points per game. That earned him the first of three straight All-Star selections and five for his career.

Though the Bucks missed the playoffs that season, Milwaukee went on to win five consecutive division titles with Johnson as its leading scorer.

Prior to playing in the NBA, Johnson won a national championship at UCLA. And by the end of his college career, he also racked up a National College Player of the Year award, in addition to a number of honours.

Johnson has career averages of 20.1 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.3 steals per game in the NBA. His No. 8 jersey has been retired by the Bucks.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 25.2 percent.

Kevin Johnson, PG

Resume: 3-time All-Star, 4-time All-NBA Second Team, 1-time All-NBA Third Team, 1-time Most Improved Player

A three-time All-Star who currently ranks seventh all-time in career assists per game, Johnson is recognized both as one of the greatest players to ever suit up for the Suns and one of the best point guards of his time.

Starting in 1988-89, Johnson averaged at least 20 points and 10 assists in three consecutive seasons, a feat that's only been done four other times in NBA history - once each by Oscar Robertson, Isiah Thomas, Russell Westbrook and Magic Johnson. Shortly thereafter, however, Johnson began to deal with a myriad of injuries that kept him in and out of the lineup.

Despite those injuries, Johnson has career averages of 17.9 points, 9.1 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 1.5 steals per game. His No. 7 jersey has been retired by the Suns.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 19.1 percent.

Chris Webber, PF

Resume: 5-time All-Star, 1-time All-NBA First Team, 3-time All-NBA Second Team, 1-time All-NBA Third Team, Rookie of the Year, All-Rookie First Team

Webber was one of the best players at his position in his prime.

Between the 1990-00 and 2003-04 seasons, Webber averaged 24.8 points, 10.6 rebounds, 4.7 assists, 1.5 blocks and 1.5 steals per game on some successful Sacramento Kings teams. They were knocked out in the first round of the playoffs in 2000, but the Kings made it to the Western Conference Finals in 2002, eventually losing in seven games to the Lakers, who won the championship that season.

A snapshot of Webber at his best during his prime? How about that time he went for 51 points, 26 rebounds, five assists, three steals and two blocks.

Webber also had a decorated collegiate career as one of the members of the Michigan Wolverines' Fab Five, which made back-to-back trips to the NCAA Tournament's championship game.

Webber has career averages of 20.7 points, 9.8 rebounds, 4.2 assists, 1.4 blocks and 1.4 steals per game in the NBA. His No. 4 jersey has been retired by the Kings.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 14.6 percent.

Rasheed Wallace, PF

Resume: 4-time All-Star, 2004 NBA champion, All-Rookie Second Team

Wallace was the final piece that helped the Pistons win the title in 2004. Detroit acquired him ahead of the trade deadline in the 2003-04 season and he immediately made an impact alongside Ben Wallace in the frontcourt.

Though he has only four All-Star appearances to his name, Wallace was regarded as one of the best power forwards in the league throughout the 2000s. He was a reliable presence on both ends of the court, stretching the floor out to the 3-point line on offence and providing toughness as well as rim protection on defence.

Wallace has career averages of 14.4 points, 6.7 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 1.3 blocks and 1.0 steals per game.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 8.6 percent.

Richard Hamilton, SG

Resume: 3-time All-Star, 2004 NBA champion, 1999 NCAA champion, 1999 NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player

It's difficult to mention Billups and the two Wallaces without also considering Hamilton.

The fourth star of the Pistons team that won the championship in 2004, Hamilton helped Detroit make six straight Eastern Conference Finals appearances between 2003 and 2008 as the team's leading scorer. At his peak, he was one of the best midrange scorers in the league.

Helping Hamilton's case is his sterling three-year career at the University of Connecticut.

As a sophomore, Hamilton led the Huskies to the Elite 8 thanks in part to an iconic shot in the Sweet 16 to defeat the Washington Huskies.

As a junior, Hamilton led UConn on a magical run through the 1999 NCAA Tournament, culminating in UConn's win over Duke in the final to win the national championship.

Hamilton has career averages of 17.1 points, 3.4 assists, 3.1 rebounds and 0.8 steals per game in the NBA.

Basketball-Reference has his Hall of Fame probability at 1.7 percent.

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