Utah Jazz v Houston Rockets

Mitchell endures own playoff bump

donovan-mitchell-pj-tucker-050518-ftr
Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz is guarded by the Houston Rockets PJ Tucker (Getty Images)

SALT LAKE CITY - He saved one of his best performances for the morning of a playoff game, when Donovan Mitchell once again showed the poise and maturity that's taken him places where few rookies in history have earned the right to travel.

Hours after Ben Simmons, the unapologetic and self-proclaimed best rookie in the NBA, laid an egg against the Celtics by scoring one measly point and instantly became a social media punch-line, Mitchell refused to pile on his rival.

This took guts, especially after Simmons dismissed any comparisons between himself and Mitchell weeks ago, but Mitchell went high road and had a veteran's response anyway:

"The biggest thing that people don't understand is that every player has that night. You look at LeBron against the Mavs in the Finals … there was one year when I was watching Harden in a playoff game against the Warriors and he had like 10 turnovers. So it happens to everybody."

Yes, to everybody … and how prophetic, even to Mitchell, who rose to stardom by chopping down Russell Westbrook and Paul George in the first round, only to come close to pulling a Simmons in Game 3 of the Jazz-Rockets series Friday night.

"I didn't really do much as a whole," he said.

Keep up to date with all of the latest :tag: news!
Sure Not Now

He struggled. He wasn't a factor. This wasn't the rookie who pulled the Jazz to the playoffs by commanding double teams and dunking with force and dropping shots from deep. This was different. This was … one of those games Mitchell spoke about. He missed 10 of his first 11 shots. His 10 points were his lowest for a game since Feb. 7 when he scored seven against the Grizzlies.

"I had terrible shots," he said. "I don't know how many shots I missed, but the shots I missed were terrible shots that weren't good looks. I can't do that."

Therefore, there were two factors which made for a strange and non-typical night for the Jazz. His disappearance, along with Utah's No. 1-rated defense coughing up 39 points in the first quarter, gave the Rockets a breezy 113-92 victory and a 2-1 series lead.

The Rockets finally broke 110 points for the first time this series, no major surprise given James Harden and Chris Paul and their three-point mentality. That's too much fire to keep contained for very long. And whenever the Rockets break loose as they did, it puts massive pressure on the Jazz to keep up, which they couldn't, if only because they're not built for engaging in a scoring contest with most teams, let alone the Rockets. It's the surest way to a quick basketball death.

"For us," said Jazz coach Quin Snyder, "the margin for error is not so great when you play a team [like Houston]."

Just as alarming is Mitchell's slow fade this series. He's shooting 33 percent overall and 24 percent from deep, and this is sudden and unexpected, even against the No. 1 seed in the West. Maybe not for most rookies. But Mitchell raised the bar for himself after a strong regular season and a ballistic effort against Oklahoma City where he averaged 28.5 points and 7.2 rebounds and never once looked overmatched or uncomfortable in his first taste of the playoffs and high stakes.

And isn't that the ultimate sign of respect for a player, when a poor game, or a small string of them, are met with a surprise reaction?

Mitchell has made himself into that special player already. He's the rare dunk contest winner who's just as dangerous from deep, a one-two combo that won over his Jazz teammates quickly and made him the club's No. 1 option almost from the jump. Mitchell's money move is a rapid burst off the dribble into the lane, where he'll then execute a smooth spin move garnished with a gentle finger roll for the basket. OKC still has flesh wounds from that move.

He delivered constantly in the final few months when the Jazz became one of the top three teams in the NBA, at least record-wise, and soared up the West standings. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar are the only rookies to hit 200 points faster in the playoffs than Mitchell, who did so in eight games.

But those shots haven't fallen with regularity here in the second round, and this was punctuated in Game 3. Either the Rockets have wised up -- which usually happens when a team sees the same player every other night in a playoff series -- or the rookie wall is playing a cruel trick on Mitchell by rising up in May.

Snyder is betting on the former: "They shaded Donovan to his left hand and he has to adjust to that, and I think he can."

Mitchell doesn't really have a choice if the Jazz plan to extend this series. There's nobody riding shotgun on Utah that frightens anyone; Joe Ingles dropped 27 on Houston in Game 2 but followed up with six. Other than Mitchell, there's no consistency, nobody who's a big threat, and when others turn chilly, Mitchell is often forced to press, which he did Friday.

Chris Paul said: "We just tried to make it tough on him. Donovan's been great all year but Trevor [Ariza] is good defensively and Clint [Capela] is challenging him at the rim. He's a tough cover and it's hard to stop him with one person. Guys have to do it collectively. We try to make him feel crowded."

Which means the Rockets will take their chances on Ingles and Derrick Favors and Rudy Gobert beating them, a wise strategy.

Mitchell's load is heavier than most rookies, even more burdensome than Simmons' in Philly from a scoring standpoint. Simmons has Joel Embiid and JJ Redick. Mitchell must be the lead singer for Utah, or else. Those are the odds, anyway, and the Rockets exploited that Friday.

"I think the biggest thing is, my mindset has always been the aggressor," Mitchell said. "Now they're playing me in a certain way where I've got to make certain passes that I just didn't make the entire game. That will be what I'll take away the most. It's like I would've been better off not showing up, and that's what I did. I didn't show up for my teammates. I'll fix it."

That's some pretty strong accountability there. However, Mitchell can't do it all against a team like Houston, even though he's done exactly that up to this point of the season. He may not be a "rookie" anymore, or play like one, but he's human.

Much like Simmons and everyone else.

Here's more of what Mitchell said about Simmons:

"It just so happens that it happened to him, and I expect him to respond back. He's a good player. Good players respond back, and it's all about the response. It's a testament to his character. But it happens. He can't play great every night. It's not as easy as some people think."

No, it isn't, and the league's showpiece rookies discovered the hard way, on back-to-back nights, here in the playoffs where rookies don't normally shine or at least for long before they're figured out.

Yet, as Mitchell said: It's all about the response.

Game 4 is Sunday, a day for atonement.

Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years.

The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA or its clubs.

More from NBA.com

#Griffin
Griffin drops 50 points and game winner against 76ers in OT, Pelicans remain unbeaten
Benyam Kidane
#Rondo
Lakers' Rondo opens up about scuffle, calls Chris Paul 'horrible teammate'
NBA.com Staff
jokic-102318-ftr-nba-getty
Is Jokic the best passing center in NBA history?
NBA.com Staff
kings-102318-ftr-nba-getty.jpg
Best-case comparisons for Kings' young stars
Gilbert McGregor
joel-embiid-102318-ftr-nba-getty
Embiid: 'I want to win the MVP'
Gilbert McGregor
curry-davis-jokic-102318-ftr-getty.jpg
Overreactions to the first week of the season
NBA.com Staff
More News